Last edited by Vudolkree
Sunday, July 26, 2020 | History

6 edition of The Tragedy of Childbed Fever found in the catalog.

The Tragedy of Childbed Fever

by Irvine Loudon

  • 69 Want to read
  • 24 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gynaecology & obstetrics,
  • History of medicine,
  • 20th century,
  • c 1800 to c 1900,
  • Childbirth,
  • Infectious Diseases,
  • Medical,
  • Medical / Nursing,
  • Europe,
  • Gynecology & Obstetrics,
  • History,
  • Medical / Gynecology & Obstetrics,
  • Medical / History,
  • Medical : History,
  • Europe - General,
  • Puerperal septicemia

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages256
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL10138325M
    ISBN 10019820499X
    ISBN 109780198204992

      In the ward that was staffed by physicians and medical students, 13 to 18 percent of new mothers were dying of a mysterious illness known as the childbed fever, or puerperal fever. Puerperal fever, also called childbed fever, infection of some part of the female reproductive organs following childbirth or of fever of °F (38 °C) and higher during the first 10 days following delivery or miscarriage are notifiable to the civil authority in most developed countries, and the notifying physician clarifies the diagnosis later, if possible.

      It is known as childbed or puerperal (from the Latin words for child and parent) fever. Dr. Nuland's book, a result of years of study on this topic, is certain to stir up a storm in the normally. In fact, fear of childbed fever is often mentioned when discussing Elizabeth I’s reluctance to marry and bear children. In the Tudor era Elizabeth of York, the mother of Henry VIII, died of Childbed Fever as did two of Henry’s wives: Queen Jane Seymour and Queen Kateryn Parr, though Kateryn’s child was fathered by her fourth husband.

    Book Overview In Genius Belabored: Childbed Fever and the Tragic Life of Ignaz Semmelweis, Theodore G. Obenchain traces the life story of a nineteenth-century Hungarian obstetrician who was shunned and marginalized by the medical establishment for advancing a far-sighted but unorthodox solution to the appalling mortality rates that plagued new. In a Hungarian obstetrician named Ignaz Semmelweis, reflecting on his years as resident in the Vienna maternity clinic, wrote a graphic account of his attempt to diagnose and eliminate the then epidemic scourge of childbed fever. The resulting Etiology triggered an immediate and international squall of protest from Semmelweis’s colleagues; today it is recognized as a pioneering classic 5/5(1).


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The Tragedy of Childbed Fever by Irvine Loudon Download PDF EPUB FB2

Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth throughout Europe up to the Second World War. Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and resulted in miserable and agonizing deaths for thousands of women every year.

This book provides the first detailed account Cited by: Even though this book opens with the chilling tale of Mary Wollstonecraft's death from childbed fever inthe author, a British medical historian and physician, does not focus on women's exper.

Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and caused thousands of miserable and agonising deaths every year.; This book provides the first comprehensive account of this tragic disease from Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth up to the Second World War 4/5(1).

Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth up to the Second World War throughout Britain and Europe.

Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and caused thousands of miserable and agonising deaths every year.

This book provides an account of this tragic disease from its recognition in the 18th century up to Author: Irvine Loudon. Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth up to the Second World War, throughout Britain and Europe. Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and caused thousands of miserable and agonizing deaths every year.

Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth throughout Europe up to the Second World War. Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and resulted in miserable and agonizing deaths for thousands of women every year.

Childbed fever was by the far the most common cause of deaths associated with childbirth up to World War II throughout Britain and Europe.

Otherwise known as puerperal fever, it was an infection which followed childbirth and caused thousands of miserable and agonising deaths every year. Irvine Loudon Oxford University Press, £40, pp ISBN 0 19 X Rating:![Graphic][1]![Graphic][2]![Graphic][3] This is an extended monograph about a once terrifying infection, whose reality is now recalled only by those who lived in the pre-antibiotic era.

Its whole history is covered—early beliefs about the nature of the disease, the importance of midwives, the epidemics within. Buy The Tragedy of Childbed Fever by Loudon, Irvine (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. The book appears, upon first reading, to be overly Whiggish in approach, focusing on the emergence of germ theory in the history of puerperal fever perhaps to the detriment of other important areas, such as medical theories not relating to contagion.

On these terms, The Tragedy of Childbed Fever is an admirable piece of work, meticulous in. Tragedy of Childbed Fever, The From Canadian Journal of History, 4/1/03 by Hallett, Christine. The Tragedy of Childbed Fever, by Irvine Loudon.

Oxford, Oxford University Press, xiv, pp. $ Cdn (cloth). A favoured approach among medical historians at the end of the twentieth century was the study of a particular disease.

The Tragedy of Childbed Fever by Irvine Loudon. Oxford University Press, £40, pp ISBN 0 19 X. Rating: ★★★. The Tragedy of Childbed Fever The Tragedy of Childbed Fever Whitfill, Kimberly By Irvine Loudon.

Oxford: Oxford University Press, pages, $ hardcover. Reviewed by: Eugene R. Declercq, MBA, PhD, Professor and Associate Chair, Department of Maternal and Child Health, Boston University School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts.

Postpartum infections, also known as childbed fever and puerperal fever, are any bacterial infections of the female reproductive tract following childbirth or miscarriage. Signs and symptoms usually include a fever greater than °C ( °F), chills, lower abdominal pain, and possibly bad-smelling vaginal discharge.

It usually occurs after the first 24 hours and within the first ten. It is widely believed that he was the first person to discover that puerperal fever was contagious, that his discovery led to the virtual disappearance of the disease, and that his thesis The Etiology, the Concept and the Prophlyaxis of Childbed Fever () is.

Semmelweis wanted to figure out why so many women in maternity wards were dying from puerperal fever — commonly known as childbed fever. He studied two maternity wards in. This chapter discusses the reduction in puerperal fever mortality in Great Britain during the 20th century.

The improvement in the prevention and treatment of the disease is attributed to the development of vaccines, antisepsis, and important research on the biology of the streptococcus.

Between andmaternal mortality was significantly reduced. This chapter reviews the epidemiology and some of the main features of the history of childbed or puerperal disease.

Puerperal fever became recognized as a specific disease only during the first half of the 18th century when midwifery started to become part of regular medical practice and lying-in hospitals were established.

It discusses endemic and epidemic puerperal fever, the trend in. K. Codell Carter is professor of philosophy at Brigham Young is the author of numerous books, including Childbed Fever, The Rise of Causal Concepts of Disease, and A First Course in Logic.

Barbara R. Carter has taught at Cornell University and Brigham Young plays hammered dulcimer with the Salzburg Folk Ensemble and is currently writing a book, Seven Reviews: 7.

What Was Then Known. I want to share with you a rather lengthy excerpt from a marvelous book on Semmelweis, The Doctors’ Plague, by the contemporary medical historian Sherwin B. will notice that Dr. Newland summarizes Semmelweis’s background knowledge of the magnitude and details of the childbed fever epidemic by introducing each short paragraph with the phrase “observation.

Similarly, well into Irvine Loudon's satisfying new history of childbed, or puerperal, fever, readers are jolted by his account of that disease's brief but sudden and terrifying reappearance in Boston's "Rosebush-scratch epidemic" and the puzzling scientific questions left in its wake.When he finally did write a book, The Etiology, the Concept, and the Prophylaxis of Childbed Fever, it was difficult to read and failed to impress many obstetrical his health failing and his behavior increasingly erratic and inappropriate, Semmelweis was committed to a.

Puerperal, or childbed, fever was a mystery, but both doctors and hospitals made it worse. Wherever the medical men went the disease grew more common, and in their hospitals it was commonest of all.